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 Post subject: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 12:36 pm 

Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2011 11:13 pm
Posts: 52
Stopped by Kloke Locomotive works this morning and took a few "Work in Progress" pictures of the York. They can be found here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/41428530@N03/


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 2:43 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 3:41 am
Posts: 3032
Location: Inwood, W.Va.
She's looking great, but I look at those cab photos, and I wonder how the engineer sat in there on the bench (it's the section of the cab over the drivers) with the notched quadrant for the Johnson bar running right in front of it. Ouch!


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 9:26 pm 

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:37 pm
Posts: 435
Location: Missoula MT
I believe many an engineer was impaled on the Johnson bar, sadly. I was noticing some of the spring rigging right below the fireman "bench". If this is pretty much as she'll run, it will be a heck of a wayback machine to 19th century locomotive operation.

Not finding good cab interior shots of the Jupiter or the 119 at Promontory Point. Wonder how they compare?

Michael Seitz
Missoula MT


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 10:16 pm 

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 1:07 pm
Posts: 138
Location: Utah
mikefrommontana wrote:
Not finding good cab interior shots of the Jupiter or the 119 at Promontory Point. Wonder how they compare?

Michael Seitz
Missoula MT


Promontory Summit. Promontory Point is a peninsula in the middle of the lake and no tracks ever went there.

Trying to find my interior pictures of the 119...
Here's one in operation http://www.flickr.com/photos/drgw223/7324368350/in/photostream

If this helps, here's a video of the first day of last year's operating season. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=we0vyHKxEQ4&list=UUTja8bVlDXarO3L-gRdglKg&index=12

And engineer Steve Sawyer explaining to me how he preps the 119: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNbyMmMQRdA&list=UUTja8bVlDXarO3L-gRdglKg&index=13


Attachments:
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15928_316832291754294_1494851319_n.jpg [ 127.29 KiB | Viewed 2874 times ]
64968_316832271754296_2070593977_n.jpg
64968_316832271754296_2070593977_n.jpg [ 76.49 KiB | Viewed 2874 times ]

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The official D&RGW 223 website
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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 10:51 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 3:41 am
Posts: 3032
Location: Inwood, W.Va.
Mike, I took another look at the photo you mentioned, and the spring rigging is on the engineer's side, too, behind a jog in the Johnson bar. That rigging is also just visible in the 119 cab ride provided by Utah Josh, so yes, she'll be one heck of a WABAC machine, running at some speed between York and Hanover Junction! About the only way to make her more authentic would be to switch her to coal (an idea I like), and to run with those replica coaches the group wants to build, with link-and-pin couplers and no air!

Egads, even I wouldn't be that crazy. . .and thankfully, the group ordering this isn't, either.

As to the Jupiter at Golden Spike--man, those colors may be authentic, but where are my sunglasses? Whooee, she looks good, but she's also mighty bright!


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 11:25 pm 

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 9:34 pm
Posts: 1885
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
I don't think any engineers were impaled on Johnson bars. There is going to be another seat on top of the raised "bench", so the Johnson is at your left knee. And, you would have to be running in reverse, but a collision in reverse would throw you away from the lever, not towards it.

Broken drive rods, that is a relevant risk, especially on camelbacks.

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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 11:58 pm 

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:42 pm
Posts: 2431
softwerkslex wrote:
I don't think any engineers were impaled on Johnson bars. There is going to be another seat on top of the raised "bench", so the Johnson is at your left knee. And, you would have to be running in reverse, but a collision in reverse would throw you away from the lever, not towards it.

Broken drive rods, that is a relevant risk, especially on camelbacks.


I wonder if he was talking about when you're moving the johnson bar under load and it moves with quite a bit of force. You wouldn't be "impaled" in a literal sense, but you might have a painful experience if you're unlucky.


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 9:47 am 

Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 1:32 pm
Posts: 114
Well Johnson Bars are called back breakers for a reason, and unhooking one at the wrong time can severely injure or kill you. Or if you're lucky just throw you through the front of or out the back of a locomotive cab. Luckily very view engines work under the type of load these days where there is a real danger of that.

Taylor


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 10:30 am 

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 2:14 pm
Posts: 457
Location: Essex, Connecticut, USA
Greetings:
Unlike the other replicas built by or based on O'Connor Engineering, "YORK" is equipped with "balanced" valves, which ought to mitigate difficulties in reversing or hooking up the valve gear.
J.David


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 8:19 pm 

Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2011 11:13 pm
Posts: 52
I will say that when you're riding Leviathan at speed it certainly amplifies any track deficiencies. I can only imagine what it must have been like on a 19th century roadbed.


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 12:40 am 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 5254
Location: southeastern USA
Interesting. GENERAL was reputed to ride "like a Pullman" back in the 1960's. How did MASON ride, B&O guys?

Few very old 4-4-0s to use for comparison.

dave

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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 2:24 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 8:28 am
Posts: 2438
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
J.David wrote:
Greetings:
Unlike the other replicas built by or based on O'Connor Engineering, "YORK" is equipped with "balanced" valves, which ought to mitigate difficulties in reversing or hooking up the valve gear.
J.David


In layman's terms, wheat are "balanced" valves?

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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 4:10 pm 

Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 12:41 pm
Posts: 378
Location: Minneapolis, MN
wilkinsd wrote:
J.David wrote:
Greetings:
Unlike the other replicas built by or based on O'Connor Engineering, "YORK" is equipped with "balanced" valves, which ought to mitigate difficulties in reversing or hooking up the valve gear.
J.David


In layman's terms, wheat are "balanced" valves?


A "balanced" valve means a slide valve equipped with various devices intended to reduce the apparent steam pressure pushing the moving part of the valve down on its seat. As boilers got better and higher steam pressures became common it also became more and more difficult for the valve gear to operate the valve and for the engineer to adjust the timing with the Johnson bar. In the late 1800 various methods of "balancing" or reducing the friction between the valve and its seat were invented. Thus the term "balanced valve". This friction and the inability to control it is the primary reason piston valves were developed and found favor in the early 1900's.


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 4:13 pm 

Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 12:41 pm
Posts: 378
Location: Minneapolis, MN
wilkinsd wrote:
J.David wrote:
Greetings:
Unlike the other replicas built by or based on O'Connor Engineering, "YORK" is equipped with "balanced" valves, which ought to mitigate difficulties in reversing or hooking up the valve gear.
J.David


In layman's terms, wheat are "balanced" valves?


A "balanced" valve means a slide valve equipped with various devices intended to reduce the apparent steam pressure pushing the moving part of the valve down on its seat. As boilers got better and higher steam pressures became common it also became more and more difficult for the valve gear to operate the valve and for the engineer to adjust the timing with the Johnson bar. In the late 1800's various methods of "balancing" or reducing the friction between the valve and its seat were invented. Thus the term "balanced valve". This friction and the inability to control it is the primary reason piston valves were developed and found favor in the early 1900's.


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 Post subject: Re: York Construction Photos
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 4:14 pm 

Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 12:41 pm
Posts: 378
Location: Minneapolis, MN
wilkinsd wrote:
J.David wrote:
Greetings:
Unlike the other replicas built by or based on O'Connor Engineering, "YORK" is equipped with "balanced" valves, which ought to mitigate difficulties in reversing or hooking up the valve gear.
J.David


In layman's terms, wheat are "balanced" valves?


A "balanced" valve refers to a slide valve equipped with various devices intended to reduce the apparent steam pressure pushing the moving part of the valve down on its seat. As boilers got better and higher steam pressures became common it also became more and more difficult for the valve gear to operate the valve and for the engineer to adjust the timing with the Johnson bar. In the late 1800's various methods of "balancing" or reducing the friction between the valve and its seat were invented. Thus the term "balanced valve". This friction and the inability to control it is the primary reason piston valves were developed and found favor in the early 1900's.


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