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 Post subject: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 6:40 am 
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The locomotive shown below is a relatively small drivered Consolidation (Victoria Railways K190) operational at the Victoria Goldfields Railway in Maldon, Victoria, Australia. It is unusual in that it has Boxpok drivers, more commonly applied to large drivered, fast locomotives.

If Boxpok like drivers were desired, I would have assumed that they might have used Bulleid Firth Brown (BFB) wheels designed by Oliver Bulleid and Firth Brown were a later variation through a separate patent where a lighter wheel was obtained by using a strengthened rim. One of its major advantages over a spoked wheel is the more uniform support provided to the tyre.

The locomotive was built in Australia at Victoria Railways Newport shops. Presumably they could have used an Australian designed variant of the Boxpok idea, the SCOA-P wheel. SCOA-P wheels were developed in the late 1940s by the Steel Company of Australia Ltd (the P in the acronym standing for F. C. Paynter, who patented the design).


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 9:06 am 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 1:51 pm
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Location: Baltimore, MD
Here, have some free Photoshopping.....


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:13 am 

Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 8:04 pm
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Location: PA
Something about it just reeks of metre gauge French Polynesian design.

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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 1:24 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 8:28 am
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The Chicago Great Western rebuilt a number of small, slow speed freight locomotives with either Boxpok or Scullin disc drivers. Some were 2-6-0s I believe.

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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 1:59 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2005 1:25 pm
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I see no wisps of steam, so is K190 operable, or strictly a display engine? Did I miss that bit of info?


Les


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 5:28 pm 

Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2008 4:55 am
Posts: 9
Location: Ballarat, Victoria, Australia
Definitely operable - it has been on loan to the Victorian Goldfields Railway from main line operator SteamRail Victoria, and is certified for main line operations.

Some of the VR A2 4-6-0 express passenger locos also had Boxpok drivers, and there were examples of both with a mix of spoked and Boxpok drivers.

Bruce


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 5:31 pm 

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 9:56 am
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Location: Rochester, NY
Alexander D. Mitchell IV wrote:
Here, have some free Photoshopping.....


Why? it looked better before...
Scot


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 6:33 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2005 1:25 pm
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scottychaos wrote:
Alexander D. Mitchell IV wrote:
Here, have some free Photoshopping.....


Why? it looked better before...
Scot


ADM IV did the photoshopping I'm sure, to bring out some of the details. So, thanks for that. But in actuality, the engine sure looks good both ways!

Les


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 12:35 am 
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CGW wasn't the only road to apply disc drivers to smaller locomotives. Kewaunee Green Bay & Western 2-8-0 #49 has a disc main driver. It's at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum.

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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 1:23 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2005 1:25 pm
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There is a photo in my "Steam Locomotives of the Frisco Line" book by Lloyd E. Stagner of 1906 Brooks built 4-6-0 #724 with a set of Scullin disc-centered drivers. The set of 63" drivers sure gives the little Ten-Wheeler a different look!

Les


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2013 6:27 pm 
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How cheerfully odd, that after having posted this oddity, steamlocomotive.info would acquire a photo of a locomotive in preservation with the SCOA-P wheels. See the photo below of Victoria Railway 2-8-0 No. J 516.


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 2013 3:41 am 

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:49 am
Posts: 21
With the J Class and the SCOA-P wheels, there are 11 of this class remaining out of 60 built. 1 is currently operational, at the same railway that K190 was running at in the above pic and 2 are in the middle of overhauls. Both will hopefully be back in service in the next 12-24 months. J516 will be one of the next to be restored once one of the current overhauls is completed.
Cheers, Al.


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 2013 9:14 pm 

Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2008 4:55 am
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Location: Ballarat, Victoria, Australia
Another "oddity" from Tasmania was the last steam locos purchased by the Tas Govt Railways in 1952-53 - 10 light Pacifics, and 8 Mountains, all built in the UK, and fitted throughout with SCOA-P wheels.
Both classes were fully fitted with roller bearings on all axles and motion, and in addition the H class were bar framed, making them arguably the most modern steam locomotives in Australia

Interestingly, all of the M class Pacifics survive, one in the UK, one in Victoria, and the remainder in Tasmania., as well as 5 of the H class Mountains.
Is there any other class of locos that anyone knows of where the entire class is preserved??

Bruce


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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2013 12:57 am 
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Both of the Canadian Pacific class K1a 4-8-4s are preserved. I am sure there are also some locomotives preserved that were the only members of their class.

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 Post subject: Re: A Preserved Oddity
PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2013 12:18 pm 

Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 5:03 pm
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Location: The Northeast
Roberval & Saguenay #17 in Boone, IA is 1 of 1.


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