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 Post subject: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 10:01 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 3:41 am
Posts: 3031
Location: Inwood, W.Va.
I have a weird brain. Someone says something, or some thought comes to mind, and my mind goes somewhere else. . .

Recent discussions on 19th century steam, including the workings of various spark arresting stacks, colors and finishes, tender trucks, and even Carl Fallberg's "Fiddletown & Copperopolis," got me to digging out my copy of "Bonanza Railroads," by the late Gilbert H. Kneiss, and checking up on the surviving locomotives from the railroads he profiled.

Of the roads in the book, one with plenty of power that's still around is the queen of shortlines, the Virginia & Truckee:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_a ... e_Railroad

No. 11, the Reno:

http://www.moneymaker.com/ghosts/trains/vteng11m.jpg

Years later the 11 was refitted as an oil burner, with a straight stack, but retaining her short smokebox:

http://trn.trains.com/~/media/import/im ... 900&mh=600

http://www.moneymaker.com/ghosts/trains/eng11vtm.jpg

Sadly, she has not fared too well in preservation. Sold to a movie studio and later being sold as a movie prop at Tuscon, she suffered a devastating fire; since then, the locomotive has been "cosmetically restored," and we are glad she is still with us, but. . .

http://www.arizonaandpacificrr.com/spot ... reno97.jpg

http://www.arizonaandpacificrr.com/spot ... no2002.jpg

Sister No. 12, the "Genoa," I believe, never was converted to oil, and was always a wood-burner. She lives today in the California Railroad Museum in Sacramento:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=319345

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 207&nseq=9

No. 13, the "Empire," is also at Sacramento:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 98&nseq=10

No. 18, the "Dayton," and No. 22, the "Inyo," are at the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Carson City, Nev.; judging from the material on the web, No. 22 is the queen at Carson City:

http://www.nsrm-friends.org/photo/vt_lo ... yton07.jpg

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 54&nseq=27

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 240&skip=2

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 64&nseq=46

http://www.kkcowgirl.com/inyo.htm

No. 20, the "Tahoe," is at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 84&nseq=39

No. 21, the "J. W. Bowker," is a "switcher" with a relatively unusual 2-4-0 wheel arrangement. The "Bowker" still retains the water pump she was fitted out with for fire fighting service, mounted atop the boiler:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacksnell707/4980108875/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacksnell707/4980100931/

The unnamed No. 25 and No. 27 are similar but not quite identical 4-6-0s built in 1905 and 1913 respectively, and both are at Carson City. Their middle sister, No. 26, was destroyed in an enginehouse fire just before the end of service in 1950. There are those who thought the 26 committed suicide at the thought of scrapping. . .

http://www.kkcowgirl.com/25.htm

http://www.nsrm-friends.org/nsrm99.html

http://www.nsrm-friends.org/vtrr27.html

http://www.rgusrail.com/album/nvnsrm/vt_27_04.jpg

Oh, blast, those things called "Honey, do" projects. . .will try to get back with the narrow-gauge engines profiled by Mr. Kneiss. . .some of which are celebrities today. . .


Last edited by J3a-614 on Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:13 pm 

Joined: Thu Feb 26, 2009 3:07 pm
Posts: 453
Location: B'more Maryland
Just a quick note, because the Kalmbach sites all use Sitecore (a web content management system with which I am very familiar), you can sometimes enlarge their photos by messing with their URLS.

Chop the max height and max width parameters off of this guy, for example:
http://trn.trains.com/~/media/import/im ... 900&mh=600 gets you this:
http://trn.trains.com/~/media/import/im ... 10_11.ashx


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 11:24 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 3:41 am
Posts: 3031
Location: Inwood, W.Va.
Argh, computers are great when they work, and horrible when they don't and loose your original post! Anyway, here's a second try on the narrow-gauge engines that were listed as preserved by Gilbert Kneiss in "Bonanza Railroads," originally published in 1941, with subsequent editions in 1943, 1947, and 1954. The links to these locomotives will be listed as in the order in which they appeared in the book. Interestingly, all are Baldwins

The first is a jewel we know quite well--Construction No. 3763, built in 1875, Dan Markoff's Eureka:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eureka_Locomotive

http://www.narrowgauge.org/images/stan/ ... tsrr-6.jpg

http://www.narrowgauge.org/images/stan/ ... srr-10.jpg

http://www.narrowgauge.org/ncmap/excur5 ... _stan.html

Another survivor is almost as well known--Construction No.5575, built in 1881 as Nevada Central's second No. 2, we know her today as the "Emma Nevada" from the late Ward Kimball's Grizzly Flats Railroad:

http://www.oerm.org/pages/GF.htm

http://www.oerm.org/pages/emma.htm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/light_rider/2829851251/

In addition to Kimball purchasing No. 2 privately as the Nevada Central was dying, two other engines also went into preservation--No. 5 and No. 6, both via the Pacific Coast Chapter of the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society. No. 5, a 4-4-0 built in 1876 with Construction No. 3843, was originally North Pacific Coast No. 12, Sanoma (and is a sister to the Eureka) and it is in that identity that the engine is displayed at the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento:

http://www.csrmf.org/library-and-collec ... -12-sonoma

https://uwycfq.blu.livefilestore.com/y1 ... %20(Custom)[12].jpg

http://209.85.120.98/viewphoto.php?id=112805&nseq=63

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacksnell707/2952839733/

No. 5 and No. 6 would respectively portray Central Pacific No. 60, the Jupiter, and Union Pacific 119 at a pageant of the history of the West during the 1939-1940 San Francisco World's Fair. Originally built as Utah & Northern's No. 13, (Construction No. 4562, 1879) No. 6 is also at Sacramento, in the identity of its second owner, the Nevada Short Line, as that road's No. 1:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacksnell7 ... otostream/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacksnell7 ... otostream/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacksnell7 ... otostream/

The 1947 and 1954 editions have an extra chapter on the Nevada County Narrow-Gauge Railroad. A 2-6-0 survives of that road (which for some reason Kneiss listed as a 4-4-0). Baldwin Construction No. 3709, built in 1875, was originally No. 1, the Tahoe, of the Carson Tahoe Lumber & Fluming Company of Carson City, Nev.

http://www.ncngrrmuseum.org/pb/wp_c65d458f.html

http://www.theunion.com/article/2004062 ... /106260087

http://www.theunion.com/apps/pbcs.dll/m ... auge%26%23

http://www.steamlocomotive.info/vlocomo ... isplay=158

http://nevadacountyhistory.org/NevadaCo ... useum.aspx

http://jeffpelline.files.wordpress.com/ ... ciety2.jpg

http://sierrafoothillsreport.com/2010/0 ... -railroad/

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=29448

Several things have stood out as I "retraced" a fascinating path outlined by Kneiss. One of these was how many of these older locomotives were preserved by movie companies as large props, which suggests we owe some debt of gratitude to Hollywood, despite other shortcomings they have (now, if only they would listen to some of us here!). Another is how colorful 19th century steam could be, and yet as noted by Ron Travis in another post, the effect is most pleasing when done accurately on an appropriate locomotive--not gaudy at all, although quite bright in some cases. Another is the sadness at looking at "the ones that got away," among them Nevada Central's No. 1 (a twin to the Emma Nevada, cut up at the time the other engines were sold), Virginia & Truckee's 26 (fire), and V&T's 2nd No. 5 (a large, modern Alco 2-8-0, bought in 1947 from the Nevada Copper Belt and scrapped only three years later). . .

And all this in turn has lead to more "discoveries," in the form of authentically restored locomotives and a replica or two--and maybe a dream about what to do with some of them. . .when I get the time. . .


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 1:07 am 

Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 3:41 am
Posts: 3031
Location: Inwood, W.Va.
One of the most fascinating things that is still around is the former Boston & Providence Daniel Nason," the last surviving "Dutch Wagon" (inside-connected) 4-4-0 in America:

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM5B ... t_Louis_MO

http://www.waymarking.com/gallery/defau ... 2394&gid=2

At the New York World's Fair of 1940:that's a most impressive steam dome, and it looks like vents for the safety valves double for a bell bracket:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/34370769@N07/4313726407/

Hmm, look what else turned up:

http://www.1939nyworldsfair.com/worlds_ ... _day_6.htm

http://www.1939nyworldsfair.com/worlds_ ... lroads.htm

http://www.1939nyworldsfair.com/worlds_ ... Parade.htm

We don't do things like that anymore. . .

Among the historic locomotives keeping the Nason company was Northern Pacific's "Minnetonka," a Porter from 1870:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 264&nseq=1

We are so fortunate to have what we do from early years, including the "William Crooks:"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Crooks_(locomotive)

http://postcardy.blogspot.com/2011/06/w ... ve-in.html

A film clip of the Crooks in operation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Po34PEt ... r_embedded

Another amazing old survivor is the Chicago & Northwestern's Pioneer:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pioneer_(locomotive)

http://www.fuzzyworld3.com/3um/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=4415

http://www.trainweb.org/evrailfan/chap1.html

A query: this image shows up in several places, but what is interesting is the location and perhaps the era. Can anyone identify those?

http://crankylove.net/images/Pioneer_or ... b35324.jpg

That'll do for now--and there is more to come, if I can find it and the time. . .


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 12:56 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 1:27 pm
Posts: 362
Location: Milford,Mass
HI All

I would like to take a guess on the last , photo , The engine is C&NW Pioneer, The top of the neg photo taken 1940 , and I think the location is Chicago , Illinois at the C&NW Passenger Depot located on Wells Street.


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 1:18 pm 

Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 12:47 pm
Posts: 40
The Pioneer pic. is probably from the 1883(!) Chicago Railway Appliance Exhibition. The structure is a display building rather that a trainshed. If the neg. is marked 1940, it's likely the time at which it was copied from a glass plate. The old oil headlamp and bracket that she used in service are still in place; these would be subsequently removed. The eight wheel tender is already missing. A four wheel 'replica' was construced for the 1948 Chicago Railroad Fair. It's too bad they couldn't have just left her alone.


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 1:31 pm 

Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 12:47 pm
Posts: 40
The negative notation seems to read '1893' rather than 1940, although it still could be '1883'. I can't see it well enough to be sure. 1893 of course would indicate the World's Columbian Exhibition, also held in Chicago.


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 2:53 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 1:27 pm
Posts: 362
Location: Milford,Mass
HI all

First I stand corrected , yes it is a Train Shed , not Depot, on the top of the Glass Plate , if you enlarge it , it is hard to read , but it looks like 1940 . Also in the background look at the heavy weight equipment , I do not think the C&NW railroad had that type of equipment in 1893 . Pat


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 3:39 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 1:27 pm
Posts: 362
Location: Milford,Mass
Hi all

On my last post, I was wrong on date of 1940 , I found information dealing with photo c 1898 please follow link for information .

http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/file:pion ... ilehistory

maybe this will clear things up Pat .


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 11:18 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 3:41 am
Posts: 3031
Location: Inwood, W.Va.
Talk about serendipity! I get, as an early Christmas present, a copy of John White's "American Locomotives, An Engineering History," and this particular edition is from 1997 (the one I had seen from a library had been a 1968 edition, the first one). This revised edition includes some additional representative locomotives, and one of them is the "Marmora," the last surviving "Eddy Clock."

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustinholm ... otostream/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustinholmes/4490488355/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/64099509@N ... hotostream

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2558/397 ... f777a5.jpg

This is a discovery for me, not knowing that one of these was still around. She looks a bit rough in the photos, and is apparently not in the best location for photography, and is missing her tender (wonder if that's still around somewhere)--but can we honestly say we have saved too much to have this antique around? Would you want to put her on a proposed scrapping list?

Maybe instead of a huge culling of equipment, we need to look at how to get the resources to do the job properly? Blast it, it should be possible in this country, even with the current reduced economy. Look at some of the other things we spend money and other resources on--and at the same time, at the other things we neglect, including a pre-Dreadnought warship.

I hate to say it, but this doesn't make me as proud to be an American as I would like to be.

Well, when I get the time, I'll look at what else is still around from early in the preservation field.


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2011 12:24 am 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 8:51 pm
Posts: 1483
Location: Southern California
J3a-614 wrote:
The 1947 and 1954 editions have an extra chapter on the Nevada County Narrow-Gauge Railroad. A 2-6-0 survives of that road (which for some reason Kneiss listed as a 4-4-0). Baldwin Construction No. 3709, built in 1875, was originally No. 1, the Tahoe, of the Carson Tahoe Lumber & Fluming Company of Carson City, Nev.
The line actually operated up on Lake Tahoe at a location now called "Glenbrook."

A sister locomotive from the Carson & Tahoe Lumber & Fluming still exists and is part of the collection of the Nevada State Railroad Museum. This is the "Glenbrook" and was #1 of the Carson & Tahoe. The "Tahoe" was the #2 and there was a third 2-6-0 without a name that came 1877.

The "Glenbrook" also dates from 1875 and is undergoing a long term restoration. The project once involved a new boiler, but the project now involves replacing only the pressure course of the boiler. This project has had to take second place to several other projects at the museum; but it seems that it has moved up in priority.

The Friends of the NSRM has this page on its website:
Carson & Tahoe Lumber & Fluming Locomotive No. 1 Glenbrook

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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2011 12:30 pm 

Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2009 5:51 pm
Posts: 78
The original post in this thread mentions V&T #18 "Dayton". This locomotive is now located at the Comstock History Center in Virginia City, NV and is the centerpiece of their exhibit. The hall in which she is displayed is rather narrow and is very dark at one and and rather bright at the other. Because of this, she is difficult to photograph, but here is what she looks like today:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 080&nseq=8

The display track does extend outside the hall for a short distance, but the museum staff indicated that the locomotive has only been taken outside once and the operation to do that proved sufficiently difficult that there are no plans to do it again.

/Kevin


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2011 11:07 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 8:28 am
Posts: 2438
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
J3a-614 wrote:
Talk about serendipity! I get, as an early Christmas present, a copy of John White's "American Locomotives, An Engineering History," and this particular edition is from 1997 (the one I had seen from a library had been a 1968 edition, the first one). This revised edition includes some additional representative locomotives, and one of them is the "Marmora," the last surviving "Eddy Clock."


The Eddy Clock is at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis. The tender is long gone. The locomotive survived, like many early examples of preservation, by pure accident. It was used as a stationary boiler to heat a station on the B&M, sans tender, when Purdue University was seeking examples of early locomotives for a planned railroad museum. Off she went to West Lafayette, to spend most of her time in a metal shed in the back of campus, safe from WWII scrap drives. She's been under cover at MOT, along with other examples of the Purdue Collection. While she may appear to be "rough" she is in essentially the same condition she was in when she arrived from Purdue in the 1950s.

She is safe, and not on any "scraping" list. Of course, the Transportation Museum Association, the non-profit fundraising arm of the Museum of Transportation would be glad to take your donation for the cosmetic restoration of this Eddy Clock. The year is nearing its end, donate a bit, to save you from the tax man.

http://transportmuseumassociation.org/

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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 2:23 am 

Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2005 1:25 pm
Posts: 4994
KevinM wrote:
The original post in this thread mentions V&T #18 "Dayton". This locomotive is now located at the Comstock History Center in Virginia City, NV and is the centerpiece of their exhibit. The hall in which she is displayed is rather narrow and is very dark at one and and rather bright at the other. Because of this, she is difficult to photograph, but here is what she looks like today:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 080&nseq=8

The display track does extend outside the hall for a short distance, but the museum staff indicated that the locomotive has only been taken outside once and the operation to do that proved sufficiently difficult that there are no plans to do it again.

/Kevin


When the wife and I went out west this past October, our one disappointment at Virginia City was finding the Comstock History Center closed that day. The outside display track did one thing however; it made us wander down to the building to see why the track was there. We probably would have missed it otherwise. I DID however, talk to two gentlemen who are involved in building the new LYON, which was very interesting. They too were disappointed that the building was not open so that a closer inspection of the Dayton was not to be that day.

Les


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 Post subject: Re: Bonanza Railroad Power
PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:01 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 3:41 am
Posts: 3031
Location: Inwood, W.Va.
Continuing on with what this thread that is turning out to be about preserved 19th century steam, I now present what may be many people's idea of a locomotive of that era, courtesy of Chance's park trains--the Southern Pacific's No. 1, the "C. P. Huntington:"

http://www.toytrains1.com/huntington.htm

http://www.katilandtrains.com/REAL%20CP ... INGTON.jpg

http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images ... ington.jpg

A postcard image, from a time when the engine was apparently on display outdoors:

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6130/602 ... 762dcf.jpg

Moderator Randy Hees had these comments to post about this engine in another thread on preserved locomotives that had been in notable accidents in their careers:

"My personal favorite is Southern Pacific Railroad No 1, the C. P. Huntington (formerly Central Pacific No 3) in the collection of the California State Railroad Museum was nearly destroyed in a head on accident on June 5, 1872 .

"The C.P. Huntington, while hauling a Watsonville-bound gravel train, collided with a northbound train near Gilroy and was severely damaged. The San Jose Mercury of June 7, 1872, noted: "the construction locomotive is small, and when the collision occurred the larger engine went completely through the smaller, taking in steam boxes, cylinders, smoke stack, driving wheels, boilers, etc., and leaving it a mass of ruins."

"A report of the rebuilding from the May 1, 1875, the Minor (sic, likely Mining) Scientific Press of Nevada – most likely taken from an article originally appearing in a San Francisco newspaper.

"LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERING – "THE C.P. HUNTINGTON"

"Editors Press: – About two years ago C.P. Huntington met with a terrible accident, and got most fearfully smashed out of form and shape. I do not mean the gentleman who bears that name, and who occupies so conspicuous a position in railroad affairs on this coast, but his namesake, the engine Number 1, belonging to the S.P.R.R. or C.P. Huntington, was one of the engines that had the misfortune to be engaged in the collision that occurred on that road, when one engineer, White, was killed, and Jerry Sullivan, and old McSawyer and other employees of the road were badly injured, and if I remember right, there some three or four passengers killed also. The engines met fact to face while they were going at the rate of twenty-five miles an hours, so that it can be easily imagined that they must have been pretty severely handled; indeed they were literally shivered to atoms. Engine Number 2 was repaired right away, but engine No. 1 was stowed up for a time, and it was not until the last few months that the administration determined to rebuild again.

"Last week it was finished, and certainly a peculiar looking craft it is. The engine is of a most unique pattern, there being but one or two others like it on the coast. The front of the engine rests on a truck somewhat n the same manner that other locomotives do, but there is but one pair of driving wheels, which are located immediately in front of the fire-box, while the hind part of the engine and the tender, which are joined together, rest on a single truck, which brings up the rear. The engine has been rebuilt in the most thorough manner by Messrs. Wilson & Smith, and all the latest improvements in locomotives have been put on that go to make a first-class engine. With the exception of one or two plates in the centre of the boiler, it is entirely new, being built at the boiler shops of the company, by Mr. J. Kelshaw. There are also new cylinders, steam-chests, steam-pipes, dry-pipes, and indeed, nearly all the main parts of the engine, with the exception of the wheels and a few other items, are new, so that as she stands to-day, it is more as a new engine than one that has been simply rebuilt. One of the Westinghouse air brakes has been put on, but the position of the air drum, and the various pipes leading thereto tend rather to detract than otherwise from the looks of the engine, and the various pipes leading thereto, tend rather to detract than otherwise from the looks of the engine, giving it a clumsy and muddled appearance. It has been painted throughout in the most somber colors that could possibly have been thought of, without making it black altogether and looks in striking contrast to the gay and bright looking engines that come out here from the East. With the exception of the bottom part of the smoke stack, which, strangely enough has been painted a flaming red, the engine and tender is of a dark brown color, relieved at places by the brown having a greenish tint given to it.

"On the side of the cab is the name of the engine, C.P. Huntington, put on in gold leaf, and Mr. Wilson, the painter, has placed some very pretty designs directly underneath, with the words "Enterprise, 1863," and on the next panel, "Progress, 1875," intending to show the enterprise and indomitable energy that in 1863, began to work and fight its way onward, in spite of all the difficulties that obstructed its path, and now in the year of 1875, we can mark the extensive progress that has been made, and the great results that have been achieved in so short a time on this new line of road.

"Taken altogether, it is a peculiar looking thing, blending as it does, in its own being, some of the crude ideas that prevailed at the time it was originally built, and also carrying with it some of the latest and best improvements that human skill and thought have been able to suggest in the engineering world. S.C.

"(Thanks to Historian Larry Mullaly for the historic information on C P Huntington)"

One of the interesting things to me about this locomotive is that it appears to have been a "stock" design. George B. Abdill's book, "This Was Railroading" (Bonanza, 1958) has photos of at least two very similar locomotives on the roster of the Oregon Steam Navigation Co., a "portage" railroad (connecting riverboat operations) that ran between The Dalles and Celilo. The two identifiable engines are the "D. F. Bradford" and the "J. C. Ainsworth," both built by Danforth, Cooke & Co. in the 1860s. According to Abdill, the road also rostered Cooke 4-4-0s, and an engine from the line was preserved. This was an 0-4-0 called the "Oregon Pony," and was built by the Vulcan Iron Works of San Francisco in 1862. Displayed at the Portland Union Station in 1958, she is now at the Cascade Locks Historical Museum in Cascade Locks, Oregon:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon_Pony

http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/entry ... egon_pony/

http://historicphotoarchive.com/capsmon ... r6044.html

http://columbiariverimages.com/PennyPos ... ca1940.jpg

http://www.billyspostcards.com/Postcard ... ve_OR.html

http://gesswhoto.com/steam-pony.html

http://portland.daveknows.org/2011/05/1 ... gural-run/

I am at turns saddened by the "ones that got away"--and amazed at what is still around. . .

So amazed, that this will have to continue, when I get the time, and when I get rid of some more of those "honey, do" projects (grrr, sometimes I think I should have stayed single. . .)


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