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 Post subject: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 1:36 pm 

Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2009 2:07 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Baltimore, MD
I wonder how much revenue railroads lost because of employee passes? I was particularly interested in the Pullman Company - it seems (from what I've seen) they gave away passes like candy. Granted, it was mostly for a berth, but still.
Thanks for any information....

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James E. Reaves
Baltimore, MD


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 2:57 pm 

Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2014 2:34 am
Posts: 498
Location: Granby, CT but formerly Port Jefferson, NY (LIRR MP 57.5)
No less an authority than John H. White Jr. had an article on this topic in Railroad History 182, Spring 2000. The title is "The Railroad Pass: Perk or Plunder".

-Philip Marshall


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 4:59 pm 

I use mine 4 days a week, saves me a ton of $$$$ and aggravation not driving into the city during rush hour and I can walk to train station from my house.


  
 
 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 6:53 pm 

Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2008 8:29 pm
Posts: 392
I have a few conductor's books from the 1940's...on SR. The people riding "dead-head" or on "passes" always seems extreme. One train showed only 28 paying passengers and 40 riding dead-head.
Overall the numbers in the book are eye-opening. It gives you real pause to see a train listed with a diner, 5 Pullman cars...and like 12 passengers. No wonder they got out of the passenger business.
T7


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2015 12:15 pm 

Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2009 2:07 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Baltimore, MD
Thanks for all the responses. I will dig up the John White article for sure.

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James E. Reaves
Baltimore, MD


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2015 2:49 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2004 2:46 pm
Posts: 2247
Location: Pac NW, via North Florida
Someone's been selling off the pass collection from a ET&WNC employee on eBay, 2-3 at a time. That guy must have had passes to ride on every railroad in the East and Midwest from all the road names that slowly creep up for sale there!

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Lee Bishop


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2015 3:01 pm 

Joined: Mon May 24, 2010 10:22 am
Posts: 540
Two factors:

1) Passes to move employees around as part of their job.
Deadhead Crews, employees traveling to distant job sites, etc.

2) Passes for "Friends" of the RR (includes Clergy), people that
route freight over your RR, etc.

The ICC did restrict passes at sometime in the early 1900s.
before that, there were a lot more passes out there.

-Hudson


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2015 12:11 am 

Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2004 10:54 am
Posts: 1167
Location: Tucson, Arizona
Termite7 wrote:
I have a few conductor's books from the 1940's...on SR. The people riding "dead-head" or on "passes" always seems extreme. One train showed only 28 paying passengers and 40 riding dead-head.
Overall the numbers in the book are eye-opening. It gives you real pause to see a train listed with a diner, 5 Pullman cars...and like 12 passengers. No wonder they got out of the passenger business.
T7


The pass system was somewhat more complex when dealing with Pullman. It would be entirely possible that the passengers were indeed covering their railroad fare with a company pass but paying a reduced fare for accommodations. It was common practice for Pullman to sell available space to railroad employees at a discount.

Other factors could increase the number of deadheads on certain trains as well. Many railroads had trains that did not honor employee passes (usually the premier expresses). Also, many railroads issued passes to officials of other railroads as professional courtesy dictated. Probably the most egregious abuse of the pass system was giving them to politicians. Employee passes were mostly a necessity, as were pie books (meal vouchers).

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"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."- Conductor Nimrod Bell, 1896


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2015 2:44 pm 

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 3:01 pm
Posts: 1589
Location: SouthEast Pennsylvania
PennCentral thought that the State of New Jersey required it to issue too many unrestricted passes for travel within the State, so the 1st Metroliners would not carry local passengers between Newark and Trenton. Those passes weren't valid on trips that crossed the State line.


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2015 5:02 pm 

Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2004 10:54 am
Posts: 1167
Location: Tucson, Arizona
The Santa Fe prohibited passes from being honored on the California Limited (predecessor of the Chief and Super Chief). The late Ned Mahoney also wrote that the California Limited was the one train that business/private cars were never to be carried on per official policy. He indicated that during his time as a secretary to division superintendents, at least one division superintendent was fired for failure to observe that instruction. He also recounted the time that the pass for his superintendent and the car got stolen from the car-it was later found in the home of a railway employee whom Mahoney described as "a Grade A kleptomaniac".

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"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."- Conductor Nimrod Bell, 1896


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 Post subject: Re: Employee Passes
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2015 6:39 pm 

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 5:10 pm
Posts: 1093
I recall back in the days of the Penn Central, freight crews regularly deadheaded between harrisburg and Philadelphia and vice versa on regular passenger trains. I often saw them on the occasions I rode those trains, no matter what time of day or night. They were always identifiable by their aluminum cases and brakeman's lanterns, and they always sat together at one end of the last car of the train. Sometimes there would be a dozen or more.


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