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Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society
http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=38936
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Author:  Cameron Wolk [ Wed Dec 23, 2015 10:53 pm ]
Post subject:  Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Hello, as the RYPN community may be commonly aware I currently am engaged in a potential project to preserve and restore AC&Y 505, the last built FM H20-44. Earlier this year I was asked by some members to pursue forming a non-profit 501c3 organization that would be able to not only maintain the engine but preserve Fairbanks Morse history as well. As of today that process is still ongoing with some new hope just around the corner. In the meanwhile I'm questioned to wonder if there is a existing group with similar goals or if I'd have to start from the ground up. If that is the case I'd like to ask if there are any passionate FM fans who'd be willing to assist in such an endeavor perhaps interested in saving the last piece of Buckeye FM history.

Cameron Wolk: Project 505 Advocate
516-350-2166
camwolk@gmail.com

Author:  CTA4453 [ Thu Dec 24, 2015 2:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

We have the 409, sister to your (former) 410 at IRM. I'd love to get it running again someday.

Author:  Jdelhaye [ Sat Dec 26, 2015 1:03 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

CTA4453 wrote:
We have the 409, sister to your (former) 410 at IRM. I'd love to get it running again someday.

SWPC 409, ex UP1369, nee FM-2000, aka "the Cement Mixer", aka "The Flamethrower"
Oral history at IRM says it took quite a bit of cranking to get it fired up the first time, and when it did finally light off, the accumulated fuel oil in the exhaust manifolds lit off, and there were 2 towers of flame out of the stacks (stories vary between 10 and 20 feet of flame).
The engine itself is in good shape, but at least one of the oil coolers is in need of repair.
When it does run, beware of golf-ball sized chunks of carbon raining from the sky (big enough to HURT when they hit!)

Jeff

Author:  Jim Baker [ Sun Dec 27, 2015 12:18 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

SWPC 408 is at the Pacific Southwest RR Museum, in Campo, CA. It last pulled a train in 1987, but has been started occasionally since. Flamethrower stories like reported above also were repeated at Campo.

Author:  Cameron Wolk [ Mon Dec 28, 2015 1:28 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Jim Baker wrote:
SWPC 408 is at the Pacific Southwest RR Museum, in Campo, CA. It last pulled a train in 1987, but has been started occasionally since. Flamethrower stories like reported above also were repeated at Campo.


I have heard stories about these flame incidents myself but have never had the experience of seeing one in person. On average how would you describe the routine maintenance of an FM reportedly I'd been warned pursuing the project solely for this reason. Reports from former MLW staff who I've been able to speak with complained of their complexity and unfamiliarity to anything they'd worked on previously. Honestly never touching an engine in my life would it be something easy to get used to or more of a struggle in your opinion? Otherwise I look forward to new progress in 2016 and hopefully we'll get some goals off the ground,

Cameron

Attachments:
505 exterior1 .jpg
505 exterior1 .jpg [ 60.03 KiB | Viewed 4535 times ]

Author:  Larry Lovejoy [ Mon Dec 28, 2015 2:55 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

I don't know anything about Fairbanks Morse locomotives, but I do know there already is another "Project 505" at work on a totally different restoration - Scranton Transit Company "Electromobile" 505.

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=38851&p=242340&hilit=+505+Scranton#p242340

While the chances of confusion are slim, you still might want to pick a different name for your undertaking. Good luck!

/s/ Larry
Lawrence G. Lovejoy, P.E.

Author:  Nova55 [ Mon Dec 28, 2015 7:02 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Oppies will run forever until they break. When they break, prepare to spend a fortune.

Author:  CTA4453 [ Wed Dec 30, 2015 2:59 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Isn't AC&Y 505 the loco listed for sale on Sterling?

Author:  Cameron Wolk [ Wed Dec 30, 2015 8:36 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

CTA4453 wrote:
Isn't AC&Y 505 the loco listed for sale on Sterling?


Why CTA you are very correct, it is. I have a potential timespan of 3-4 years to raise the funds neccesary to both purchase and move the 505 off Galveston property. A public link is set to be released hopefully by early-mid 2016 given I can successfully work the agreement with the other party involved,

Cameron

Author:  Ron Travis [ Wed Dec 30, 2015 9:31 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Would this be considered to be a "flamethrower"? I believe these are FM opposed piston engines.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_zC7QK64Ks

Author:  NYCRRson [ Wed Dec 30, 2015 9:52 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Cameron, I wish you the best of luck.

But if this is your first "big engine" restoration attempt you are picking about the most difficult and risky internal combustion beast there is (except maybe a turbine).

I have heard stories of these things running on their own lubricating oil (which accumulates everywhere inside them). Shutting off the fuel supply does not shut off the engine. It can run until all the lube oil is gone and then goodbye bearings...

Those stories came from experienced RR Motive power folks when these where in service. Apparently CO2 fire extinguishers fired into the air intakes barely slowed them down.

Some of the bigger railroads re-engined units with this prime mover as soon as they could.

I Museum I know acquired a well maintained one from a US Army depot, all the "Old Hand" could say was "Well.... good luck with it", not a ringing endorsement.

If I could, I would strongly recommend that you have some plans to be able to shut off the air inlet completely before you attempt to start one that has not run in a while.

When they sit around all the seals that are supposed to keep the lube oil in just the right places dry out and the oil gets everywhere it's not supposed to be.

Some stout (3/4") plywood panels cut to just the correct size could work. Maybe some all thread rod in place and holes in the plywood all lined up so you can quickly slam them shut and cut off the air supply.

Hopefully you will never need these and you will waste $100 on plywood, that would be a very good outcome. And the plywood will come in handy for something else.

You sure don't want one of these running on it's own lube oil while you run to the store to get supplies.....

Good luck, you are a braver man than I.

Cheers, Kevin.

Author:  daylight4449 [ Wed Dec 30, 2015 11:40 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

NYCRRson wrote:
Cameron, I wish you the best of luck.

But if this is your first "big engine" restoration attempt you are picking about the most difficult and risky internal combustion beast there is (except maybe a turbine).

I have heard stories of these things running on their own lubricating oil (which accumulates everywhere inside them). Shutting off the fuel supply does not shut off the engine. It can run until all the lube oil is gone and then goodbye bearings...

Those stories came from experienced RR Motive power folks when these where in service. Apparently CO2 fire extinguishers fired into the air intakes barely slowed them down.

Some of the bigger railroads re-engined units with this prime mover as soon as they could.

I Museum I know acquired a well maintained one from a US Army depot, all the "Old Hand" could say was "Well.... good luck with it", not a ringing endorsement.

If I could, I would strongly recommend that you have some plans to be able to shut off the air inlet completely before you attempt to start one that has not run in a while.

When they sit around all the seals that are supposed to keep the lube oil in just the right places dry out and the oil gets everywhere it's not supposed to be.

Some stout (3/4") plywood panels cut to just the correct size could work. Maybe some all thread rod in place and holes in the plywood all lined up so you can quickly slam them shut and cut off the air supply.

Hopefully you will never need these and you will waste $100 on plywood, that would be a very good outcome. And the plywood will come in handy for something else.

You sure don't want one of these running on it's own lube oil while you run to the store to get supplies.....

Good luck, you are a braver man than I.

Cheers, Kevin.

Alright, let's back this up just a second. I've never heard of any diesel running off it's lube oil... Where'd this come from?

Author:  Ron Travis [ Thu Dec 31, 2015 12:04 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Here is an explanation of diesels burning their own crankcase oil: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_engine_runaway

Author:  CJCheely [ Thu Dec 31, 2015 3:44 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Hello

I did some work on and operated US Army 1855 h 12-44 in boulder city NV.

Couple of thoughts come to mind

1. Fairbanks Morse still offered technical support a couple of years ago for these prime movers, I would suggest contacting them

http://www.fairbanksmorse.com/

2. The electrical issues you need to find a trained locomotive electrician there are a couple that do relance work that a very very goood

3. Other locomotive your just going to have to find and hunt down

Chris Cheely

Author:  CJCheely [ Thu Dec 31, 2015 3:46 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Fairbanks Morse Preservation Society

Hello

It should be noted that I smoked the taco bell out in boulder city nevada firing up 1855 and had a hell of a flame thoughers going.

Chris

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