Railway Preservation News
http://www.rypn.org/forums/

A Home For Main Line Steam
http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=41074
Page 7 of 7

Author:  J3a-614 [ Sat Jan 27, 2018 1:49 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: A Home For Main Line Steam

co614 wrote:
Much to the total surprise of nearly everyone the tests showed that at most speeds and throttle settings the 614 was kinder to the track then the diesels and this differential was greatest at higher speeds and wider throttle settings.

One of the AAR engineers said to me" so much for the old wives tale of steam being hard on the track".

Sometimes the truth is stranger than fiction.

Ross Rowland


WOW!! Even knowing how modern steam had a lot of improvements in balancing, some of which would not be obvious (the use of stiffer than normal lateral motion devices in leading and trailing trucks to reduce nosing, and thus reduce overbalance in the N&W J is one now well-known example), this still seems almost too much to believe--but believe we must!

Are you at liberty to say what enabled this, or what caused the diesels to be harder on track than a modern 4-8-4? Or was it never actually figured out?

Author:  JDParkes [ Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: A Home For Main Line Steam

J3a-614 wrote:
co614 wrote:
Much to the total surprise of nearly everyone the tests showed that at most speeds and throttle settings the 614 was kinder to the track then the diesels and this differential was greatest at higher speeds and wider throttle settings.

One of the AAR engineers said to me" so much for the old wives tale of steam being hard on the track".

Sometimes the truth is stranger than fiction.

Ross Rowland


WOW!! Even knowing how modern steam had a lot of improvements in balancing, some of which would not be obvious (the use of stiffer than normal lateral motion devices in leading and trailing trucks to reduce nosing, and thus reduce overbalance in the N&W J is one now well-known example), this still seems almost too much to believe--but believe we must!

Are you at liberty to say what enabled this, or what caused the diesels to be harder on track than a modern 4-8-4? Or was it never actually figured out?


Welp. Having been proven utterly wrong on this subject previously....

I reckon it's because one locomotive winds up a tad lighter than the 2-4 diesels they were doing to haul the same amount of train.

Considering Gen 1.5 steam locomotives (Porta, Wardale) could push 6,000 hp at decent speeds, you'd be significantly reducing the weight on the train, but not the power. Even if technically over less wheels.

Makes you wonder if someone wouldn't venture something along the lines of the DLM engines to help further reduce likely expense to swap to steam locomotives.

That included efficient light oil burning (Domestic heating oil) in a GCPS firebox (sorry clagger fans) and a great pre-heating system which brought the water gradually up to temperature automatically with nobody needing to be present, leaving the locomotive in an "unplug and throw in a match" state.

Author:  exprail [ Sat Jan 27, 2018 3:29 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: A Home For Main Line Steam

CP and UP also prohibit passenger excursions on their leased lines.

exprail

Author:  jameshinman [ Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:45 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: A Home For Main Line Steam

CA1 wrote:
Why are they so anti passenger trips on a sold portion of RR? It's not like they are legally responsible if they don't own it once the line is sold. NS isn't that draconian about it are they once the line is sold?


Here's one example. I don't know how accurate this is. RJ Corman Central Kentucky Lines. The 'Old Road' between Winchester, and Louisville, Kentucky was Louisville and Nashville. I understand that Corman owns the track and controls access, but CSX maintains ownership of the land. Again, I understand, that there are lucrative fiber optic cables underground. Corman is not allowed to operate paid passenger trains on this track. They may operate company sponsored passenger trips.

Connecting to the 'Old Road' in Lexington, Ky, is the former Southern Railway Versailles Branch. Corman owns every bit of it. When they operated the Lexington Dinner Train, it was over the Versailles Branch, and not a bit on the Old Road.

I'm not familiar with the intricacies of Lawyering, but it's been said that CSX could still be liable for a passenger wreck, owning only the land.

James Hinman

Author:  Dave [ Sun Jan 28, 2018 9:44 am ]
Post subject:  Re: A Home For Main Line Steam

Gas producer combustion technology is for coal fired locomotives. Light oil firing is being done most extensively on the rack engines built by SLM / Sulzer, and by the Ffestiniog for a while. Both are excellent compared to old school efficiencies, but not complementary.

Author:  JDParkes [ Sun Jan 28, 2018 10:03 am ]
Post subject:  Re: A Home For Main Line Steam

Dave wrote:
Gas producer combustion technology is for coal fired locomotives. Light oil firing is being done most extensively on the rack engines built by SLM / Sulzer, and by the Ffestiniog for a while. Both are excellent compared to old school efficiencies, but not complementary.


I could have sworn Porta developed a firebox that could do both.

Author:  J3a-614 [ Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:42 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: A Home For Main Line Steam

Hmmmmm----something I've been saying for years------

EDIT: And I have to laugh at negative responses!! Apparently the inability to recognize a touch of satire is not limited to the United States. Take heart, we are not alone!

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... lectricity

Page 7 of 7 All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
http://www.phpbb.com/