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The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops
http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=41388
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Author:  Kelly Anderson [ Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:02 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

DWH wrote:
Kelly; as usual absolutely beautiful shop space and machines. Who makes the planer? I'm starting a shaper rebuild and want to get my hands on a planer. They are just too cool.

The Planer is a Whitcomb-Blaisdell.
John Risley wrote:
what kind wood and what kind of treatment does the new planks on the tender get when replaced.

That planking dates from her 1988 overhaul, just repainted while the tank was off for frame repairs, so I am not certain as to what type of wood it is, most likely it's mahogany, which is what we default to when rot resistance is needed.
softwerkslex wrote:
Quote:
The notches in the flange are needed so the two bends can be made in the sheet.


In the old days, I guess these were formed without cutting and welding. How did they do that? More swearing?

Also, is that steady on the LeBlond lathe home made?

In the old days, the sheet would have been formed on dies in a four column press in the same way an automobile fender is made today, ka-chunk. Not a very handy method for a one-off job. Here is a video that shows a three dimensional sheet being formed on a press starting at 5:50. YouTube.

Yes, the steady rest is homemade, and will swing 14”.

Author:  bigjim4life [ Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:13 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

Great to see #37 in the shops and being worked on - although I'll admit - I wish she was staying in the area once she is done (whenever that is). I missed seeing her run on the Wilmington & Western.

Author:  Ron Goldfeder [ Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:46 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

Would that #14 O&K 0-4-0T be properly called a Well Tank loco, a British term used for those with a water tank under the boiler and between the frames? They would describe it as an 0-4-0WT.

Author:  Kelly Anderson [ Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:20 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

Ron Goldfeder wrote:
Would that #14 O&K 0-4-0T be properly called a Well Tank loco, a British term used for those with a water tank under the boiler and between the frames? They would describe it as an 0-4-0WT.

I never heard of that term, but it makes sense. The engine also has side tanks, though the left one is about 80% coal bunker.
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Author:  EDM [ Wed Nov 29, 2017 1:16 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

I've seen the term 'pannier tank' applied to some British tank engines, for what its worth.

Author:  derail [ Wed Nov 29, 2017 1:43 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

EDM wrote:
I've seen the term 'pannier tank' applied to some British tank engines, for what its worth.


This term only applies to certain tank engines on the Great Western that had side tanks that straddled part of the boiler and did not go all the way down to the frame, but didn't straddle the top of the boiler like a saddle tank does.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tank_loco ... nnier_tank

Author:  70000 [ Wed Nov 29, 2017 2:32 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

An example of a standard gauge 2-4-0 well tank (ex London & South Western Railway - originally built in 1874) as preserved here in the UK...

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This one remained in normal service until 1962 !

Author:  Les Beckman [ Wed Nov 29, 2017 4:01 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

70000 -

So listed then as a 2-4-0WT?

It appears that a second sister engine is behind #30587. Also operational? And at what location?


Les

Author:  Purdue66 [ Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

Kelly, thanks for the update. It is inspiring to see the quality and the pride that is Strasburg.

Author:  70000 [ Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:35 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

Les Beckman wrote:
70000 -

So listed then as a 2-4-0WT?

It appears that a second sister engine is behind #30587. Also operational? And at what location?

Les


Yes, 2-4-0WT - Details on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LSWR_0298_Class

Two of the class survived long enough to be preserved as they worked a china clay line to Wenford Bridge in Cornwall - One by the National Railway Museum and one privately. The private one lives at the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre at Quainton Road (about 40 miles NW of London) and the NRM one has visited various preserved lines in recent years.
They are both operational and I took the photo at Quainton Road in May 2016 when the NRM owned one was visiting for a short period

Author:  Kelly Anderson [ Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:01 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

70000 wrote:
Two of the class survived long enough to be preserved as they worked a china clay line to Wenford Bridge in Cornwall - One by the National Railway Museum and one privately. ...the NRM one has visited various preserved lines in recent years.
They are both operational and I took the photo at Quainton Road in May 2016 when the NRM owned one was visiting for a short period

I'm curious about how that locomotive is moved from place to place. Does it travel on its own wheels? If so, under tow or under power?

Author:  70000 [ Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:30 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

Kelly Anderson wrote:
70000 wrote:
Two of the class survived long enough to be preserved as they worked a china clay line to Wenford Bridge in Cornwall - One by the National Railway Museum and one privately. ...the NRM one has visited various preserved lines in recent years.
They are both operational and I took the photo at Quainton Road in May 2016 when the NRM owned one was visiting for a short period

I'm curious about how that locomotive is moved from place to place. Does it travel on its own wheels? If so, under tow or under power?


Preserved locos (and rolling stock) can only be moved by rail in the UK if they are registered to do so and thereby have to pass various stringent tests eg ultrasound axle testing - even if they are not capable of steaming/moving under their own power. All of the locos used for special excursions on the National system now require onboard monitoring/recording equipment as well for safety enhancement.
In view of this, there is quite a thriving "heavy haul" business here for moving mainly locos (and the occasional passenger or freight car) between the different lines by road. There are a couple of specialised trucking firms that have low-loading trailers just for this sort of work.........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKZN7_MGECc

When some of the bigger lines have special "Gala" events, there is an awful lot of money tied up in getting guest locos to them by road, before you start thinking about how those locos are going to be used and the money (hopefully) recouped from the fares charged. There is quite a bit of cooperation between lines though in trying to work out a sequence of coordinated road movements for stock where the "dead" mileage for the road element is kept to a minimum though.

The current listing of mainline registered steam locos here is shown below..
http://www.uksteam.info/tours/locos.htm

Even brand new stock is sometimes moved by road before they are certified to run on the network !

Author:  Kelly Anderson [ Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:27 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

Thanks for the explanation. I didn't think that something that primitive(?) would be out on the main line, but on the other hand, I didn't think England's highway clearances would allow for locomotive sized loads.

Author:  softwerkslex [ Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:05 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

UK has the highest road clearances in Europe. It is a factor in the freight modal shift. UK has the worst rail loading gauge, but the road loading gauge is the largest in UK and Scandinavia. This reflects a USA style focus on road transport in the 1960s and that the UK started motorways relatively late compared to Germany. This makes rail freight particularly weak in the UK.

Moving equipment rail on rail, a locomotive on a flat car, is not possible in Europe because of the overhead wire.

Author:  tom moungovan [ Thu Nov 30, 2017 12:06 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Latest from the Strasburg Rail Road Shops

Kelly, many thanks for all of those great photos...I am especially happy to see work again on the former Pacific Lbr. 37. She was the last of 4 of that type built for Sugar Pine Lbr., but had increased water capacity which also gave her a bit better adhesion. Glad that she was saved.
Keep up the fine work.

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