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 Post subject: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:11 pm 

Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2017 6:48 pm
Posts: 3
Just curious as to what most folks use to paint the smokebox of operating steam locomotives. Thanks.


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:48 pm 

Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:20 pm
Posts: 7
Traditionally a mix of graphite and linseed oil was often used.


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2018 10:05 pm 

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 4:29 pm
Posts: 1610
Location: Youngstown, OH
economyhaze wrote:
Traditionally a mix of graphite and linseed oil was often used.


Which left much to be desired as it didn't last long and needed heat to fully cure. I've used a mix of 50% BBQ black paint (Rustoleum) and 50% flake graphite. Others have used switch plate lubricant which is basically graphite in a binder.

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J&L Narrow Gauge Railroad
"The shortest and narrowest Railroad in Ohio"


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2018 10:53 pm 

Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:40 am
Posts: 99
Location: Chama, NM
A mixture of hi temperature aluminum and flat black stove paint makes a good coating. It takes only a small amount of black to tone the aluminum down to a fairly reasonable approximation of the traditional graphite color.


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2018 11:05 pm 

Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2017 6:48 pm
Posts: 3
economyhaze wrote:
Traditionally a mix of graphite and linseed oil was often used.

I think Japan Drier was added to help cure the paint... Anyone know what the ratio of ingredients is?


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 1:28 am 

Joined: Fri Mar 29, 2013 11:14 pm
Posts: 121
POR15 Manifold Gray. cures to a nice matte gray color, hides brush lines when it dries too. holds to the smokebox pretty good on daily use engines.


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:27 am 

Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 5:06 pm
Posts: 173
economyhaze wrote:
Traditionally a mix of graphite and linseed oil was often used.
Specifically, boiled linseed oil.

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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:21 pm 

Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 7:52 am
Posts: 2061
Location: Strasburg, PA
Here is ours, straight from the engine house supply cabinet door.

Attachment:
20180430_111557.jpg
20180430_111557.jpg [ 279 KiB | Viewed 5579 times ]

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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 3:35 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 3:37 pm
Posts: 1199
Location: Pacific, MO
Kelly, that's exactly what I used. Never measured quantities. Mixed it in a coffee can. I used a parts washer wand with a pickup hose on it. Made a great graphite sprayer and you could control the spray. I had someone walk around with me holding the can and keeping the graphite in suspension while I sprayed.
Made very short work of the firebox with all those staybolt sleeves. That used to be a mess to do with brushes.
I wasn't there when the very first application was put on back in 88, but told the guys to use vertical strokes with the brush. They didn't.
I always liked the way the last method looked. It was bulletproof after the engine was fired up. I tried linseed oil early on and it really smelled bad so I decided mineral spirits was better along with steam oil.


Attachments:
1522 Front 9-30.jpg
1522 Front 9-30.jpg [ 164.2 KiB | Viewed 5500 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 6:13 pm 

Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2015 11:54 am
Posts: 1114
Location: New Franklin, OH
Kelly Anderson wrote:
Here is ours, straight from the engine house supply cabinet door.


Kelly,

Curiosity killed the cat.... How often do you have to apply it? And do you mind if I add that to my color data file?

Thanks.

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Orrville Railroad Heritage Society
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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 6:19 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 3:37 pm
Posts: 1199
Location: Pacific, MO
I'm not Kelly, but you don't have to apply it that often. If you started out with a good sound surface it lasted a good while.
The photo of 1522 was taken right after our two farewell trips to Newburg and back and looks like it was just put on right before the picture.


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2018 7:52 pm 

Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2017 6:48 pm
Posts: 3
Thanks Kelly & Frisco..


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2020 2:12 pm 

Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:11 am
Posts: 30
Reviving an older thread with a somewhat related question.

What is the best way to get multiple decades of layered on graphite paint off. The backhead, lower side sheets, and throat sheet all have a thick coating on them. I need to get this off to be able to get some good (hopefully) UT readings.

Thanks in advance,
Jesse


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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2020 2:25 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 6072
Location: southeastern USA
Mechanically - think wire brush on a side grinder.

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 Post subject: Re: Smokebox Paint?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2020 1:04 am 

Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 9:06 pm
Posts: 2383
Location: Thomaston & White Plains
A needle scaler will shatter off multiple layers of paint, graphite, or rust far better than a wire wheel in an angle grinder. I'd use that after the needle scaler gets the heavy thick stuff off.

Howard P.

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