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 Post subject: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 12:33 pm 

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 4:29 pm
Posts: 1213
Location: Youngstown, OH
Some of you may be familiar with the extremely heavy 23" gauge 0-4-0Ts that Porter built for the Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. to move ingot trains at their Pittsburgh Works. Several of them went to Crown Metal Products in Wyano, PA and two eventually made their way up to Benkart's Rigging in Cranberry, PA. In 1998 I stumbled across the locomotives, No. 58 and 59, and made a tentative deal with Mr. Benkart to purchase the 58 for $5,000.

However, I was saddled with the reality that I owned no land and really had nowhere to move it to, so that deal fell through. Benkart sorely needed the space that the locomotives occupied, and after my friend and I noticed that one of the cylinders on 59 had frozen and broke, Benkart decided to scrap the 59. Through a post here on RYPN we found a taker for the boiler, the Niles Canyon RR in California, and it went west, the frame was cut up and the drivers, rods and misc. other parts were set aside.

That ended my involvement with the two locomotives. I did not know what had become of the 58, but a few years later discovered that it had been moved to the J.S. Company in Middlefield, OH, and that Pete Jedlicka, a good friend of mine, had purchased it from Jonas. Recently while in search of a steam locomotive project for us to work on at Youngstown Steel Heritage I made a deal with Pete to purchase the 58 and to move it to Youngstown for a full restoration to its original appearance, including a return to operation.

Since the 58 is a steel mill locomotive it fits into our mission at Youngstown Steel Heritage. Although not specifically of Youngstown significance, it is similar to countless small Porters built for steel mill service. The 58 is not your typical two footer. In working order it weighed 93,000 lbs., has frames of SOLID steel plate, solid steel drivers and even the bottom plates of the saddle tank was 4" thick. It was built to pack as much tractive effort as possible into a package 20' long, 6' wide and 8' tall. The locomotive also does not have many of the standard appliances found on other locomotives such as brakes, headlights, bell or even coal storage capacity. It was built strictly for moving extremely heavy ingot buggies within a tightly confined area, and apparently was fueled in between switching moves from trackside piles of coal located in strategic areas.

I am making arrangements for moving the 58 to Youngstown, and over the past couple of weeks I have been laying 23" gauge track for it to roll on. I am using 100 lb. RB section rail laid mostly on steel ties bolted with no. 62 crane rail clips. This includes a 40' radius curve, about as sharp as I dare take the loco over. The track will extend about 300' to the end of our property and will have at least two sidings that run back toward our main building.

The ultimate goal is to construct a small fleet of ingot mold buggies, have some new ingot molds and ingots made, and get to the point where we can demonstrate the entire ingot teeming and stripping process. For those who are not familiar, the old way of making steel involved pouring molten steel out of a bottom pour teeming ladle into cast iron ingot molds. The steel solidified into ingots which were then rolled in a blooming mill and finishing mills to finished shapes. Today continuous casting has eliminated ingots from all but small specialty steel mills. The ingot molds are carried on small extremely heavy flatcars known as ingot buggies. The ingots are teemed while the molds are on the buggies, and then they are moved out into a yard to solidify. After a certain period of time these trains are moved to the stripper where a specially outfitted overhead crane pulls the molds off of the ingots and then placed the molds on a train of empty buggies on an adjacent track. The train of stripped ingots then move to the soaking pits and the train of empty molds goes back to the Open Hearth to be teemed again.

Now that we have the locomotive, we will work on its restoration while simultaneously designing the new ingot buggies and molds. When completed, the new "ingot mold railway" will fill a gap in rail preservation by focusing on the specialized industrial side of railroading that most other museums overlook.


Attachments:
File comment: J&L 58 as she appears now. Imagine that, 45 tons of steam locomotive in a package as small as a Jeep Liberty.
IMG_5785 small.jpg
IMG_5785 small.jpg [ 159.3 KiB | Viewed 8162 times ]
File comment: Once a typical scene in any American steel mill. A small steam locomotive moving ingot mold buggies.
Ingot Mold Train.jpg
Ingot Mold Train.jpg [ 67.31 KiB | Viewed 8162 times ]
J&L 58 Builders Photo.jpg
J&L 58 Builders Photo.jpg [ 49.4 KiB | Viewed 8162 times ]

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Rick Rowlands
J&L Narrow Gauge Railroad
"The shortest and narrowest Railroad in Ohio"
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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 12:55 pm 

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 4:29 pm
Posts: 1213
Location: Youngstown, OH
More photos are posted here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33523379@ ... 174154139/

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J&L Narrow Gauge Railroad
"The shortest and narrowest Railroad in Ohio"


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 2:40 pm 

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 12:07 pm
Posts: 1016
Location: Leicester, MA.
That there is easily one of the ugliest pieces of machinery I've seen... I like it! Obviously 58 is something of a long term project, but if eveything is there, then why not give it a go?

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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 2:55 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 11:26 am
Posts: 3861
Location: Maine
Dylan, your observation is likewise true of Maine moose. They are so ugly, they are beautiful. I concur.

What I like about this project is the conduit of steam power in the industrial setting story. Context is everything, even if the locomotive is ugly.

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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 4:55 pm 

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:42 pm
Posts: 2479
I recall seeing those at Wyano and being amazed at the construction. "A steel brick with drive wheels? WTH?"

Glad one will be restored and preserved, that's an important part of the area's history.


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 5:28 pm 

Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2004 3:40 pm
Posts: 9
Check out that photo of the crown sheet. Yikes, that's what I call UGLY. Looks like boiler washes were not a regular occurrence in the lokie's later days.

A worthy preservation project, Mr. Rowlands.


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 10:45 pm 

Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 4:22 pm
Posts: 339
Excellent! Context is going to do so much in this case. A steam locomotive is one thing. A steam locomotive doing what she was supposed to do with the equipment she'd have used will be invaluable.

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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 3:02 am 

Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2004 7:17 pm
Posts: 545
Location: Ballard, WA
No hooking up this locomotive!


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 10:34 am 

Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:54 am
Posts: 795
Location: Califoothills / Midwest Prairies
Does anything remain of the Jones and Laughlin Steel plant where this operated? Perhaps a switch or some specialwork could be unearthed from a place where it has been forgotten. I would be surprised, but finding an original service car would be a nice discovery. What a neat project, and thanks for keeping us posted.
O. Anderson
moderator for the 18-23" gauge railway discussion group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/18inch


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:31 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 3:07 pm
Posts: 651
In common with the nearby USS Homestead Works the South Side portion J&L Pittsburgh Works has been essentially wiped clean and the property turned into yet another shopping and dining area. The 23" ga. system was confined to one older part of the plant and I do not believe there is any trace of it remaining. That huge fleet of locos like 58 had been replaced in the 1950s by just two 45 ton 4 wheel GE diesels, suggesting that its role in the plant was already reduced by the mid-1950s. Oddly enough a tiny Plymouth was added to the 23" ga. in later years, but it was only something like 4 tons, hence for a function not related to what the Porters or the GE's did.

Steamers weren't the only "ingots with wheels." During the scrapping of Homestead Works I found a 4 wheel 30" ga. Davenport that was originally built for the USS Edgar Thomson Works. There was in its cab a scale ticket that indicated that this loco had been scaled at 144,500 lbs. No wonder the narrow gauge at Homestead ran on 115 lb. rail--the same as standard gauge. Dual gauge 30/std. track looked like something from a Lionel tinplate set, 3 huge rails.


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:41 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 1:51 pm
Posts: 8637
Location: Somewhere north of Prescott, AZ on the Santa Fe "Peavine"
The J&L mill, last steel mill functioning in the "Steel City" at the time, was in the process of being shut down when the Chessie Safety Express I rode on in July 1981 barrelled past it.

The north side (blast furnaces) was redeveloped as the Pittsburgh Technology Center, and the south side (across the river, milling) was redeveloped as a commercial and residential development. The Hot Metal Bridge on the Monongahela Connecting RR connecting the two mills survives, converted to road and trail use.

Although it's entirely possible that a surviving slab car or whatever lingers somewhere in the complex on display, as I recall the redevelopers took a "scorched earth" policy towards the "brownfield" of the former plant. Some of the "then and now" photos I have seen are staggering in the change. So: Don't get your hopes up there.


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 1:34 am 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 1:51 pm
Posts: 8637
Location: Somewhere north of Prescott, AZ on the Santa Fe "Peavine"
Update from Facebook page of a former regular here, posted by Brother Rowlands:

Amazingly, a stash--literally, a PILE--of 23" gauge ingot carts/buggies/whatever we're calling them--has been discovered in a scrapyard.

Those of you that drool at old machinery like this should register with FB just to see what else he shot photos of. Unbe-freakin'-LIEVable.

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 8:28 am 

Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2010 9:26 am
Posts: 45
Location: Princeton, NJ
Alexander,

Which FB page are your referring to? I drool so I'd like to see!

Paul


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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 8:41 am 

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 12:07 pm
Posts: 1016
Location: Leicester, MA.
Alexander D. Mitchell IV wrote:
Update from Facebook page of a former regular here, posted by Brother Rowlands:

Amazingly, a stash--literally, a PILE--of 23" gauge ingot carts/buggies/whatever we're calling them--has been discovered in a scrapyard.

Those of you that drool at old machinery like this should register with FB just to see what else he shot photos of. Unbe-freakin'-LIEVable.

Image

I think there are more there then anyone would know what to do with...

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 Post subject: Re: Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Porter 0-4-0T No. 58
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 9:09 am 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 5392
Location: southeastern USA
Just what's needed to convert the ingot on wheels into an 0-4-4 Forney.....

dave

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