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 Post subject: New Interview: Mark Smith & the Impact of L&RP on What We Do
PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:31 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 7:37 pm
Posts: 216
Those on rypn.org active in rail heritage preservation in the mid-1980s through the late-1990s will recall a slick, well written bi-monthly titled Locomotive & Railway Preservation. Produced with high production values it featured the finest writing of practitioners in the field with slick glossy stock and top-drawer color and black and white photography. It spawned the interests of many volunteers and professionals alike who labored on restoring steam, fixing rolling stock or rehabilitating trolleys. Sadly the magazine was not sustainable what with a small circulation of readers and financial issues that thwarted its progress. It was last published by Pentrex and turned out the last issue in 1997. When it went away, readers were heartbroken. In many respects its loss spurned the creation of this web forum by those once acquainted with the magazine.

Fast forward to 2017: if you ever wondered whatever became of L&RP and former editor/publisher Mark Smith, there's a terrific new interview with him that is forthcoming in The Railway & Locomotive Historical Society's Quarterly Newsletter (available at rlhs.org) Fall 2017 issue (vol. 37 no.3), penned by John Gruber, titled "L&RP: A Champion for Railway Preservation." You won't want to miss this great tribute!

As a former L&RP staffer myself (I was an intern there from May-August 1990 and was largely responsible for preparing the 1991 Steam Passenger Service Directory for publication as well as article editing and correspondence), the magazine really did much to steer the course of my career in the field as well as for others. Mark Smith was a terrific mentor of his staff and readers, and always looked for a teachable moment. As an education psychologist by training and a former University of Vermont professor, he clearly helped shape my thinking on various aspects of rail preservation for which I am in his debt.

Mark still resides in Huntington, VT and is very much active in rail preservation--be sure to read this excellent forthcoming article to see just how much of an involvement he has and discover just exactly what he has been doing with himself all of these years since! You might be pleasantly surprised.

K.R. Bell
L&RP Alum


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 Post subject: Re: New Interview: Mark Smith & the Impact of L&RP on What W
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:41 am 

Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2012 7:22 pm
Posts: 41
Location: Northwest Indiana
Thanks for the info.
I really enjoyed that magazine.

Steve A W



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 Post subject: Re: New Interview: Mark Smith & the Impact of L&RP on What W
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:50 am 

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 8:10 am
Posts: 2332
Can't wait to read it. My meager contributions to the world of preservation were greatly influenced by the work of Mark (L&RP) and Randy Garbin (Roadside). Both of them put a voice to things that matter to me, and I am grateful for that.

Rob

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The long memory is the most radical idea in this country. It is the loss of that long memory which deprives our people of that connective flow of thoughts and events that clarifies our vision, not of where we're going, but where we want to go. B. Phillips


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 Post subject: Re: New Interview: Mark Smith & the Impact of L&RP on What W
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:30 pm 

Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2016 10:40 pm
Posts: 131
Location: San Francisco, CA
I admired Mark Smith and the L&RP magazine.

I have a full run of it on my book shelf. Sadly the economics were not on its side.

This web site is the direct outgrowth of the magazine.

Ted Miles

I am a railway preservationist through and through; working at a traction museum for almost 30 years!

TM


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 Post subject: Re: New Interview: Mark Smith & the Impact of L&RP on What W
PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 9:18 am 

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2004 11:26 am
Posts: 3749
Location: Maine
Mark has a 7.25" gauge live steam layout on his mountain side pasture, in Vermont. Over the past few years, he has constructed a 2.5" scale Rio Grande ten-wheeler to run for his own pleasure and that of guests. Beautiful detail too, just as you would expect.

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"It's only impossible until it's done." -Nelson Mandela


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