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 Post subject: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:33 pm 

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 11:21 am
Posts: 384
I think everyone on this forum knows the history of early railroads in the USA, and logging railroads and temporary trackage. Cut the trees to length, lay them down, and spike the rail on top.

However, other than photos, most of us have never seen it up close and personal. Those of us who have "worked track" and know the ins and outs of same, and the rules, are not mentally programmed to accept the logging track "standard" of back in the day.

I ran across this video, and just thought I'd share it here for the track junkies. How does this relate to rail preservation? How many museums or tourist RRs have any track like this for demonstration or display? Operate on it?............the FRA would faint.

Don't be lulled by the "mainline" trackage, at about 0:26 they branch onto a temporary woods spur........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OOqPLOWiQg


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:02 am 

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 3:01 pm
Posts: 1437
Location: SouthEast Pennsylvania
How about a "pole railroad", where thinner logs are used as rails, and the locomotives have grooved wheels!


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:19 am 
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Posts: 249
I have given both of these ideas some thought this summer. One Museum I help out at has a bare planter bed that I've thought I could build a section of logging railroad style track in. Rough cut ties, small rail, and no tie plates. The only thing that would operate on it would be a handcar, velocipede, or similar, but the museum doesn't have any of those currently.

I've wanted to ride a pole road for a few years now, but I think the only way that'll happen is if I build one first. I know where some pole road wheels are, along with a Fordson pole road "locomotive". If they could be acquired and a suitable location found, I'm sure that a straight stretch of pole road would not be too terribly difficult to build. I may have to build one in miniature for the time being, though apparently scale models of pole roads, rideable or not, are about as commonplace these days as the real thing.

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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 4:54 am 

Joined: Sat Aug 21, 2004 10:52 pm
Posts: 909
Hi,

In the 1980s or 1990s, I heard the Galveston Live Steamers were planning to build/had built a section of 7.5" gauge track showing how the track construction over the years changed. Supposedly a section was to be strap rail (wood ties and rails with strap iron on top). I am not sure if they also had intended a pole rode - I think they wanted to but I am just not sure.

FWIW

Doug vV


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:31 am 

Joined: Sun Sep 14, 2014 5:05 pm
Posts: 555
Very interesting track work. Based on the lo0ngitudal logs under the ties it must be pretty boggy ground. The big problem with building this type of track for a display is that it rots fast.


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:44 am 

Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2004 2:50 pm
Posts: 2091
Location: Northern Illinois
John T wrote:
Very interesting track work. Based on the lo0ngitudal logs under the ties it must be pretty boggy ground. The big problem with building this type of track for a display is that it rots fast.


If you look at the condition of the haulage road that parrallels the track in places, you can see why the railroad still has the advantage.

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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:54 am 

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 9:34 pm
Posts: 1885
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Track like this would have a very short life span and be high maintenance. It would be functional for one season, and then a big frost heave or wood rot would put it all out of alignment.

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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 12:00 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 10:34 pm
Posts: 611
I often find quoting "Red Green" appropriate, "This is just temporary...... unless it works".

Regards, John.


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 4:28 pm 

Joined: Sun Sep 14, 2014 5:05 pm
Posts: 555
With enough duck tape you can make anything work.


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:08 pm 

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 9:34 pm
Posts: 1885
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Quote:
I often find quoting "Red Green" appropriate, "This is just temporary...... unless it works".


I miss that show. I don't know where to find it in Denmark.

p.s. I spoke too soon. Apparently they have a completely legit channel on YouTube.

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Steven Harrod
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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:42 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2015 11:54 am
Posts: 128
Location: Orrville, OH
John T wrote:
With enough duck tape you can make anything work.


And if that doesn't get the job done, there's always bailing wire.

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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:11 pm 

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2017 5:33 pm
Posts: 2
Great video ... This is how they built logging railroad foundations ...


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:06 am 

Joined: Sat Mar 05, 2005 2:46 am
Posts: 85
Location: Elko, NV
Not too long ago I was reading accounts of the Edward Hines Lumber Company logging railroads in eastern Oregon, specifically in the mountains around Seneca, Oregon. They built a good number of their log spurs directly up shoestring meadows/glades, making extensive use of the exact kind of subgrade shown in this video. The track crews would use an AH&D slide-back loader they had to lift the track structure up, allowing them to place poles cut from trackside under the ties to support the spurs. The track crews called the poles "long gravel". They would also use carloads of lumber shipped up from the big mill in Hines (near Burns) when the pole supply ran short. Even with this, it was not uncommon for the entire track structure and sometimes a good part of the wheels on their Shays and log flats to dip almost to entirely underneath the water during the spring snowmelt and runoff...

Thanks for posting the link to the video. I really enjoyed the radio playing in the cab there towards the end...

Jeff Moore
Elko, NV


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:08 pm 

Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2017 10:34 am
Posts: 16
Mark Jordan wrote:
However, other than photos, most of us have never seen it up close and personal. Those of us who have "worked track" and know the ins and outs of same, and the rules, are not mentally programmed to accept the logging track "standard" of back in the day.

Rail directly on (pressure treated) ties and hand spiking this weekend on the 2' gauge WW&F during Fall Work Weekend

They do it twice a year in Alna, Maine. Anyone is welcome to attend and pitch in.

If 3' gauge is your favorite flavor, look up the good folks in Como, Colorado.


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 Post subject: Re: Logging Railroad Track
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:14 pm 

Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2016 10:40 pm
Posts: 124
Location: San Francisco, CA
We used to have lots of logging railroads here in California. I am wondering if any logging lines still exist in the US? If they do, I assume it would be Diesel powered?

I suppose they are as dead as clear cutting lumber lots.

Ted Miles, narrow gauge fan.

PS I think the last narrow gauge logger was the West Side Lumber Company until 1959 or 1960.


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