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 Post subject: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2019 3:00 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:48 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Milford,Ma
Almost every gauge since 1849 has come with a Bourdon tube inside. It's the metal tube that flexes when put under pressure and causes the needle on the face of the gauge to read the pressure. Here's a copy of his original US patent and some information about him.

https://blog.wika.us/products/pressu...bourdon-gauge/

https://bourdonusa.com/products/pressure-gauges

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574102358

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574102358

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... ourdon.jpg

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574102358

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574102358


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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2019 11:20 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:48 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Milford,Ma
You gotta love his mustache!


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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 1:21 am 

Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2015 10:57 pm
Posts: 21
Bourdon's original gauge was not practical for cold climates because the two ends of the tube, or "spring," were pointed down. Condensed water would drain out of the end which was connected to the steam line but would collect in the other end and freeze, bursting the tube. This design is called a "single spring" gauge because the tube is considered to be one "spring."

T. W. Lane patented an improvement to the Bourdon gauge in 1859 which solved this problem. Lane oriented the tube so both ends were pointed up instead of down. He then placed the connection to the steam line in the middle of the tube, at the bottom. Condensed water would then run out of both ends of the tube. This is called a double spring gauge because the tubes on either side of the bottom connection are each considered to be a separate spring.


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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 12:51 am 

Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:48 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Milford,Ma
Thank you for the information. Now this Ashton gauge makes sense to me.


https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574484591


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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 8:25 pm 

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 9:34 pm
Posts: 2332
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
geoff1944 wrote:
Bourdon's original gauge was not practical for cold climates because the two ends of the tube, or "spring," were pointed down. Condensed water would drain out of the end which was connected to the steam line but would collect in the other end and freeze, bursting the tube. This design is called a "single spring" gauge because the tube is considered to be one "spring."

T. W. Lane patented an improvement to the Bourdon gauge in 1859 which solved this problem. Lane oriented the tube so both ends were pointed up instead of down. He then placed the connection to the steam line in the middle of the tube, at the bottom. Condensed water would then run out of both ends of the tube. This is called a double spring gauge because the tubes on either side of the bottom connection are each considered to be a separate spring.


You could just rotate the gauge 90*.

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Lektor
Danmarks Tekniske Universitet
Institut for Systemer, Produktion, og Ledelse


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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 9:51 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:48 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Milford,Ma
The patent for the 1859 T.W. Lane gauge

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574560199

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574560199

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574560199

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574560199

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574560213


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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 10:55 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:48 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Milford,Ma
more info about Bourdon.

https://heatinghelp.com/blog/the-metal-manometer/


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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:42 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:48 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Milford,Ma
The dead weight tester is the accepted way to check the accuracy of a guage. Here is an interesting article about the tester.


https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574652406

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574652406

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574652406

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574652406

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1574652486

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1573616896


Last edited by Rick A on Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:17 am 

Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:48 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Milford,Ma
The gauge tester link from the last post.

https://www.instrumentationtoolbox.com/ ... -with.html


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 Post subject: Re: Eugene Bourdon and the Bourdon tube
PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:58 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:48 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Milford,Ma
An nice comparison of the 2 gauges.

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/attachme ... 1575571418


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